Panic Disorder Often Leads to Agoraphobia

If you avoid public places where you feel immediate escape might be difficult, such as shopping malls, public transportation, or large sports arenas, you may be suffering from agoraphobia. Sometimes, people who have panic disorder stop going into situations or places in which they’ve previously had a panic attack in anticipation of it happening again. People with agoraphobia live in a world where they are constantly on guard, waiting for the next panic attack. Some people develop a fixed route or territory, and it may become impossible for them to travel beyond their safety zones without suffering severe anxiety. Examples of avoided situations: locations (airplanes, traffic, large open spaces); foods (caffeine, sugar, alcohol); emotions (excitement, anger, anxiety); and activities (exercise, sex).

How We Help

The experienced clinicians at the Ross Center utilize effective treatment approaches including exposure therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, and when warranted, medication, to help people with agoraphobia regain their active lives. Exposure therapy will include gradual exposure to situations and places that cause the most fear. Your world will become larger, and you’ll be able to experience life more fully after successful treatment at The Ross Center.